Archive for the ‘Growth Mindset’ Category

Students are studying growth mindset, which promotes the idea that people learn through hard work and making mistakes, rather than talent alone. (Photo by Hannah Molino)

Students are studying growth mindset, which promotes the idea that people learn through hard work and making mistakes, rather than talent alone. (Photo by Hannah Molino)

By Savannah Barr
Cougar News

     Teachers and students are broadening their horizons with the aid of the growth mindset for the 2016-17 school year. The concept focuses on the idea that a person can best learn and improve skills through hard work and making mistakes, rather than skills they were born with.
     The growth mindset is the way of thinking in which one believes that you can absorb more information through hard work rather than genetics. The school introduced it last year, but emphasises it much more now.
     “Growth mindset is one’s belief that you can ‘gain’ intelligence through hard work, not genetics,” says Mrs. Roach, a science teacher for the eighth grade. “It is far more important to believe that with hard work anything is possible, rather than the belief that I am only as good as I ever will be.”
     The growth mindset can be a way for students to have more confidence in their self when they’re tackling a new or unfamiliar task. It allows them to be more open-minded and push themselves, even if they fail. People with a growth mindset understand that making mistakes is part of the learning process. Both students and teachers can benefit from this way of thinking. On the other hand, people with a fixed mindset believe people are born with their level of intelligence and talent and they cannot be changed.
     “I find it beneficial because I try to improve every time I catch myself giving up,” says Alondra Urias, an eighth grader.
     The concept of having a growth mindset has been around for years, but teachers have recently introduced it at Cactus Canyon. Some teachers came up with the idea a year or two ago when they got together and read a book titled “Mindset: The New Psychology of Success,” by Carol Dweck.
     “We really liked the concept and idea of it and thought it would be beneficial to implement at school,” says seventh grade teacher Savanna Fallon. “As teachers, we figured we needed to practice the concept ourselves before we could pass it along to the students.”
     There are many hopes that this way of thinking will make learning a more positive experience for students and teachers alike.
     Alexis Skinner says, “I think you can learn more and do better if you have a growth mindset.”

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